Sexual Abuse & Incest (Little Book Series of Emotional Health for Emotional Wealth 1)

Six Steps for Healing From Child Sexual Abuse
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For this focus, I teach and encourage clients to practice body scanning on a regular basis but especially when experiencing more intense emotional reactions. The purpose is to have clients become better acquainted with specific aspects of their emotional functioning and the associated feelings linked to their bodies. I ask clients to walk me through a recent trauma-related episode, having them focus on what they felt bodily versus emotionally or cognitively. Many clients report feeling like anxiety manifests in their digestive tract stomach, bowels in the form of cramps and intense aching or, alternatively, in the form of pressure in the temples of the head or behind the eyes.

Some clients will report a complete disconnect when they experience intense emotional reactions. They become physically numb and feel no sensation — much like physical denial. Clients who disconnect are more prone to self-harm. They tend to revisit this unhealthy form of coping even if it has not been in active state for them for some time. A common practice I use for working with this trauma response is based in mindfulness. I encourage clients to engage all five of their physiological senses by directing them to pick different therapeutic items up in my office essential oils, stones, stuffed animals, mints, wall art, etc.

Once this senses-based intervention has been practiced within the therapeutic office, I encourage clients to continue using this intervention at home. A more severe tactic of grasping ice has been found to be helpful for clients who have tendencies toward self-harm. The ice allows for a physiological stimuli or shock to the body that engages sensation centers in the brain similar to those engaged in cutting, burning, etc. The hope is that these clients will choose items that are pleasing to them over items that are unpleasant, thus creating more positive experiences that involve bodily sensations.

The final phase in this model is focused on the trauma narrative. It is at this point in the therapeutic process that clients are displaying and self-reporting more stable emotional and cognitive-related responses to stress and more effective use of healthy coping skills. I encourage survivors of sexual assault to begin writing out their trauma narratives, which occurs in session. Retelling their stories has been empirically proved to decrease the severity of the trauma response.

It also allows clients to apply new meaning to their experiences and incorporate new and positive self-views and language. I do not recommend writing trauma narratives outside of the therapy session, however, because clients with a recent trauma can still be easily triggered. This is especially true when the narrative directly engages their previous trauma.

The first time, clients read their accounts of their trauma verbatim. From there, we are able to explore and process their reactions to the narrative and gauge their level of trauma response. My experience with this model in treating survivors of sexual assault has been favorable. Using this five-phase model, I have maintained a high client retention rate of 70 percent and a low cancellation rate of approximately 25 percent compared with a typical rate of 40 percent within our center over the past 18 months.

Most clients report an overall increase in functionality after three sessions. These same clients have engaged in trauma work sooner in the therapeutic process than have our clients treated without the five-phase model. Contact her at brookelynnbagley gmail. Joel Diambra is an associate professor of counselor education, associate department head and director of graduate studies in the Educational Psychology and Counseling Department in the College of Education, Health and Human Services at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville.

He is a licensed professional counselor-mental health service provider. Contact him at jdiambra utk. Opinions expressed and statements made in articles appearing on CT Online should not be assumed to represent the opinions of the editors or policies of the American Counseling Association.

  • On Marrying a Survivor of Childhood Sexual Abuse.
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My cousin recently got sexually abused and needs to get some help. Thanks for the advice about how there are several phases including emotion focused. The book comes with bonus worksheets and guided mindfulness meditations. This is an excellent tool for understanding the social content of trauma; Herman shows parallels between the trauma of war and the trauma of childhood sexual abuse, and what people need in order to heal.

This is for the survivor who wants to understand how perceptions about the self, world, and other people are formed after trauma, and how to change them. Think of it as real-life applied psychology. Moore, a survivor of domestic abuse and cyberstalking-turned-leading lawyer and cyberstalking authority, has written this practical guide to help people prevent and escape cyberabuse and cyberstalking. This book uses clinically tested mindfulness practices to help readers meet their anxiety with clarity and compassion.

There is also a helpful workbook you can purchase separately, and access to audio material through the website. Rosenberg explores relationships, needs, and practical communication techniques, as well as tips for understanding other people better. Using this guide, you can learn how to speak to yourself and others from a place of love, and how to have clearer and calmer conversations with everyone in your life. Often referred to as the bible of childhood sexual abuse recovery, this book is a manual of healing, much loved through all of its additions by survivors and therapists alike.

The latest editions contain up-to-date research about trauma, healing tools and methodologies, a more diverse array of survivor voices, encouraging check-ins with survivors well into their recovery, and more. This very popular guide is meant to help women navigate, process, and express their anger in healthy ways rather than repressing it, as society so often tells women to do. This is one of the classic resources for male survivors of sexual abuse, now updated with current research on trauma and recovery, an examination of cultural attitudes toward male sexual abuse and incest survivors, practical and compassionate advice for healing, and personal narratives.

Similar authors to follow

This is a collection of racially diverse voices across the gender spectrum from within the anti-violence movement. This book moves beyond dominant narratives of sexual violence and centers the experiences, and spotlights 37 deserving stories of trauma, activism, and empowerment. If it would be empowering for you to read a searing account of colonialism, how sex trafficking and abuse of Native women continues, and ways for the tribal nations to seek redress, then this is a great book for you.

Deer is a powerful activist and writer addressing real, ongoing issues of sexual violence against native women and seeking solutions. By looking at colonization as the first wound, Linklater contextualizes native trauma and speaks with ten indigenous healthcare practitioners to discuss indigenous wellness, mental illness, and recovery. This book is full of practical measures for individuals and communities who have experienced trauma, and draws on indigenous cultural knowledge and worldview to inform ideas of healing, recovery, and wellness.

This self-help guide is intended as a resource for African-American survivors of sexual assault, offering resources, strategies for coping, prayers from Black spiritual leaders in a variety of traditions, and first-person accounts. Zambrano has a lot of experience working in Latin communities and helping Latinas leave domestic violence situations and navigate prejudiced and unsympathetic police, documentation issues, need for translators, how to get to a shelter and protect yourself and your children, and what the church might say.

This book is a practical and compassionate guide for surviving and leaving an abusive relationship. Ardea uses her own experience of childhood sexual trauma and her healing journey as a guide, developing a workbook for readers to experiment with their own healing through journaling, art therapy, exercises, and accessible self-care ideas. This is a sex-positive, somatic approach toward sexual abuse and incest recovery, geared toward the reader who is ready to embrace sexual healing and reclaim their sex lives, whether they are single, partnered, heterosexual, or LGBTQ.

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Bonn International Model United Nations. About the Author. It is amazing how being shown a simple, different way in looking at things can maybe help to pave a more positive way forward. University of St. I reported the sexual abuse I endured from my father 25 year ago. The guerilla pimp uses physical force and fear to manipulate victims, and commonly kidnaps and physically abuses them to maintain control Goldblatt Grace, ; Mones, ; Ring,

This is a classic self-help book for men and women who survived sexual abuse and would like to reclaim their sex lives and sexuality. This book has exercises, advice, and stories to help readers enjoy safe, compassionate, loving sex. Danylchuck connects trauma theory and yogic philosophy and focuses on the foundations of yoga and their applications toward healing rather than just the physical forms of yoga.

Reading this, you will also learn more about how the nervous system works and reacts to trauma and stress, and how you can affect the nervous system with breathwork, yoga, and other practices. This book explores a somatic approach by using trauma-sensitive yoga techniques to help survivors recover and reconnect with their bodies. Emerson is one of the current leading trauma-sensitive yoga researchers and trainers.

Another great book from Emerson, this one more focused on how to use trauma-sensitive yoga to treat survivors, the research supporting the methods, and how they help.

The Compassion Cure

Peter Levine, founder of the SomaticExperiencing method of trauma therapy, walks the reader through the research and theories of his methods, as well as plenty of exercises for the reader to try on their own or in a therapeutic setting. Using body-based somatic approaches, Dr. Levine normalizes trauma responses and creates exercises to help heal them.

This book, while not specifically for trauma survivors, focuses on how a yoga practice can help heal anxiety and stress using mindfulness, deep relaxation, and compassionate listening. This has become a touchstone text for understanding trauma, its effects on the body, and methodologies of healing. Sometimes, life feels like a game of truth or consequences. At some point, most of us have pulled an all-nighter hard to get through college without it.

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Crystal dildos may not come cheap, but are they worth the price? And I thought, "Oh, my gosh. My dad's dad was a womanizer? So when I started putting the pieces together of the family history, I started getting this feeling, this realization that came into the "I," which was Insight - you know, Awareness and then Insight - that I was just a piece on a chess board and I had nothing to do with any of it.

It all had to do with family systems. It had to do with the part that everybody played that contributed to me, but I was just there, and I didn't even have a chance. I mean, there was nothing I could have done to have stopped it. And not only that. You know, when I was little kid, when this happened, I lived in a town that had people in it, and there was no I couldn't pick up the phone and call anybody. And years later I talked to a neighbor of ours that had lived in that little town with us, and she said, "You know, your mother used to tell me all the time how unclean you were, what a bad person you were, what a liar you were, how I shouldn't have anything to do with you.

And I knew you were a really good person. I couldn't figure out why was your mother lying about you? I couldn't - there's nobody I could go to. Fathers don't rape their daughters. David : What a life you have come through, I must say. Now, the next letter is R for Rhythm. Where does Rhythm come in here? Marjorie McKinnon : Oh, boy. That's just a wonderful, wonderful thing. It dawned on me, as I was getting to the end of my recovery, that there were bits and pieces of who I was before I was raped that was returning to my psyche, to my personality, that I had forgotten I had.

And so I called it Rhythm, because I feel that when we are born, we all have our own natural rhythm. We're full of laughter, or we're real quiet, or we love to do this kind of music or that kind of music. But we have our own little rhythm that we march through life to. And when you're abused as a child, sexually or otherwise, that rhythm that is yours stops, and you go - it hides somewhere and you become that which you are really not in order to try to cope with all the abuse. If you're spontaneous and you will find that you learn to keep your mouth shut.

You learn to be obedient to the rhythms your parents or your abuser start planting in you. And part of that was when I did a lot of inner child work, and that really helped, and that really - that was so real. Marjorie McKinnon : You got to take all that - yeah, you got to get rid of the garbage in between what you were then and what you are now, and you literally go back to that which you were before - even if you were three years old or younger.

I mean, I just think when we're born we all have our own stamp. Marjorie McKinnon : Oh, yes. Well, after I - yeah, after I got rid of my abuser, one thing I did do; I went back to that house. Petersburg, Nebraska was the little town I lived in at the time. I went back to that house we lived in. And I asked her if I could look through the house, and I wound up going into that back bedroom, and - oh, my gosh - everything just comes popping out at me so fast.

I felt like I have to do this. This is the hardest thing I could possibly do, so that's why I'm going to do it, because it's what I need to do. I had to sit and talk to my inner child for a long time, get her calmed down. Went back home. Within a few weeks was able to get rid of my abuser and file for divorce and felt happy and wonderful. But I still was kind of shaky because now I was living a whole new life I wasn't used to. So, you know, that's why I did a lot of post-recovery work, which was self-help tapes - not just self-help tapes, but how to be a better person, how to live your life joyfully, and all of those kind of books that were especially out during that time.

There were so many of them. And I'd go to different programs. I would sign up for a weekend retreat or something - any place that I could find that had - could give me more information about how to live my life the way I want to. David : Well, that's interesting, you know, because I think sometimes people are critical about all the self-help books that are out there and all the workshops that go on.

But it sounds like you were really able to use those as resources in your recovery to bolster you up, to give you insight, to sustain your motivation. Marjorie McKinnon: I did. Yes, I was. I was able to use it. But I also was able to decipher which ones worked and which ones didn't, like particularly for me. I mean, that one book might have worked for somebody else, but it didn't work for me, and so I didn't waste my time going in a direction that I intuitively knew was not my direction to go in. And during that time, I think I found out a lot about inner voices. And it's interesting that my mother, shortly before she died, had written a letter to her parents.

And in the letter she said something about, "I wish I had listened more to my inner voices. I know what's the truth and what isn't the truth, and I know where to go and what to do. All I got to do is listen to my inner voices and then take action. And that was a big step that I learned during recovery and in post-recovery. Now, I see that you've written 15 books. When did you write 15 books? Was it - were you writing all through this process? Or was it after the point that you were pretty much recovered?

Marjorie McKinnon : Oh, most of them are after recovery. Actually, the booklet You Hurt and Don't Cry Out , which was basically my memoir, and I've never tried to publish that - that was the first one. I wrote that while I was in recovery. And then I went back to where I used to live, and while I was there, I think it started opening up different doors. It started triggering my memory when I was back there. So one time I went back there, and then I came home.

In the middle of the night, I thought, you know what? I got to write this book. I don't know why I got to write this book. So I wrote this novel, a mystery novel, about a woman who had to return to the town where she had been born, a small town in the Midwest, in order to discover a secret of something that happened to her when she was a child. And it's got nothing to do with incest or sexual abuse or anything, but that story started coming out of me, so I wrote a whole mystery about that, and it was called, When First We Practice to Deceive.

I mean, this is after recovery, during all those several years. In fact, I think when I married Tom, which was in the year , I think I wrote four of them after I was married to him. I just couldn't stop writing. And I couldn't seem to get my program going. And I couldn't get the program going, couldn't get anybody interested in the book, and so I made use of my time by writing, and that's when I wrote all of those books. And a lot of them I did research on. I'm a very heavy reader. I read about 15 to 20 books at a time, and I read like 60 books a year. Marjorie McKinnon : You should see the library where I'm at right now.

Our third floor has a floor-to-ceiling library in it. It's different Twilight Zone episodes that have happened to me. David : Oh, well, let me cut in because we're not going to have time go to through all 15 books. Has it been helpful to other people? What do you know about the impact that it's had? Marjorie McKinnon : Well, it was published in I actually wrote it probably about three or four years after I finished recovery, which would be like '97 or something. But sales have been slow, but the feedback I get is incredible.

I mean I get a lot of emails from people that tell me that they were ready to pull the plug on their life, and then they found my book, and that it's the only book they've ever found that would help them. And I've never heard anything but constant praise about this book. If you go to Amazon. David : Oh, wow. That's really something. And you went on to found an organization called the Lamplighters. How did that come about, and what is the work of the Lamplighters?

Healing from Sexual Abuse & Incest - Mental Health help with Kati Morton - Kati Morton

Marjorie McKinnon : Well, that was like a - I think I mentioned, when I was in recovery at one point, I said I wish I had a lamplighter, somebody who would show me the way. So we were back here living in - we live in Arizona. We were here by that time, Tom and I were. So I decided that I was going to start this, so he did a website for me. And it was basically for people to start chapters where they could get together and tell their stories, because telling your story is the beginning, it's the key, and once you start telling your story, you're on your way to recovery.

And I did a lot of traveling around the different states before I wrote REPAIR, having interviews with different people, what they would like to see in a program that would help them. And I can remember being in Nebraska and talking to a bunch of women on a park who were having their lunch, and I started telling them my story. And one woman said, "Why are you talking about this as if it isn't your fault?

What is there about a year-old laying in a bottom bunk with a rosary under her pillow getting raped by her father that's her fault? She'd spent all her life thinking it was her fault. So I thought there's a lot of women out there that need to go to a chapter where they can tell their story safely amidst other people who have a story, because it's such a shameful, shameful thing to talk about. But if you're in a room full of other people that have gone through the same experience, it empowers you.

And so my first chapter was - I got a phone call from a gal in a little town in northern Minnesota called International Falls, and she wanted to start the first chapter, so I told her, "Sure, go ahead. All you need is you and one other person and a place to have it, and I devised the Lamplighter code. I said, "Just read that code at the beginning of the meeting, and then you guys just all tell each other your stories, and you got yourself a chapter, even if it's just you and one other person.

And then they eventually, after they got their chapter going, they invited me to come back for three days of giving speaking engagements at the college and the community in different places around there. My father delivered me in this town, and this is the first chapter that I have. Marjorie McKinnon : You know what?

Counseling survivors of sexual assault - Counseling Today

When I was in recovery, one of the things I did is I went to my father's grave - because he was dead by then - and I just spent like four hours crying and screaming and carrying on. I was so full of anger. And then I told him at the end, "If you want to do restitution for what you did to me, you will help me get some kind of a movement started.

You will help me get my words out to people that I write in books. But you will do this for me, and then I can forgive you. That's my -" I felt like it was my dad pulling strings, trying to make restitution from wherever he is - wherever they send child perpetrators. I don't know. Marjorie McKinnon : Oh, yes, there are. It's been a while, but we now have 80 chapters in 13 countries. Marjorie McKinnon : Yeah, we have 17 chapters in Africa. Africa has a huge, huge problem with it. Marjorie McKinnon : And so we have - yeah. I just finished that, and it's now with his editor, should be out before the end of the year.

David : Well, that's great. I want people to know that they can go to your website to get more information about the Lamplighters, because I'm sure your story will have touched some listeners. And that website is www. Marjorie McKinnon : Yeah, w ww. David : Right, and as we wrap up here, Marjorie, is there any last thought that you'd like to leave listeners with? Marjorie McKinnon : If you in any way at all know or feel that you were sexually abused as a child, please get help now. Get a copy of REPAIR and work that program, because if you wait too long, it will impact the children that you have and their children, because it's multigeneration.

You've got to stop it now. That program works. It really, really works. Marjorie McKinnon : Thank you for asking me. I just really appreciate it. And thank you for reading my book. David : I hope that Marjorie McKinnon's story will have touched and inspired any of you in the audience who may be recovering or who may know others recovering from childhood incest or other sexual abuse. If you're interested in finding out more about Marjorie's work or the Lamplighters organization, you can on the Web to www. You've been listening to Wise Counsel, a podcast interview series sponsored by Mentalhelp.

If you found today's show interesting, we encourage you to visit Mentalhelp. Access the show's page and show archive information via the podcast box on the Mentalhelp.

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Sexual Abuse & Incest (Little Book Series of Emotional Health for Emotional Wealth 1) eBook: Susan Jane Smith: pymybapifysy.tk: Kindle Store. Sexual Abuse & Incest (Little Book Series of Emotional Health for Emotional Wealth 1). by Susan Jane Smith | Sold by: Amazon Australia Services, Inc.

If you like Wise Counsel, you might also like ShrinkRapRadio, my other interview podcast series, which is available online at www. Until next time, this is Dr. David Van Nuys, and you've been listening to Wise Counsel. Her youngest daughter had previously raped at gunpoint by a masked bandit. She is available for speaking engagements across the country.

Marjorie and her husband, Tom, were both McKinnons when they met on a genealogy website. After a 16 month long distance courtship they were married in the year in Melrose, Scotland. Tom is the illustrator of her children's books. Now, here's the interview. Marjorie McKinnon, welcome to Wise Counsel.

Marjorie McKinnon : Thank you for having me. We're just now meeting, so it's kind of throwing you into the deep end of the pool all at once here, but if you could - Marjorie McKinnon : Sure. David : Oh, my goodness. Now, how long did this abuse go on? Marjorie McKinnon : For five years. David : For five years. And was he your biological father or stepfather? I fell - David : Before you go on, what did you get out of that year in therapy? Marjorie McKinnon : He said that. David : Wow.